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Chiropractic adjustments, also known as spinal manipulations, are a procedure in which a joint is moved past its usual range of motion in daily life. Moving the joint beyond its range of motion sounds painful, doesn’t it? However, the joint is not moved beyond the range of motion it is naturally designed to move in the body.

You may feel pressure or mild discomfort, and the discomfort may be greater if there is significant inflammation or tension around the joint being treated. However, chiropractic adjustments should not be painful.

If you are new to chiropractic medicine, you may have a harder time relaxing during the procedure than more experienced patients. If you stiffen or resist the adjustment, you may feel some discomfort. However, as you get used to the procedures you should find not only that the discomfort decreases, but that you may feel relief and a sense of well-being after being adjusted.

During the procedure, you will be placed in a certain position to treat the affected areas. Usually you will be lying face down on a padded table. There may be popping or cracking noises during the adjustment, as the joint is moved. These noises are the result of the release of tiny pockets of gas during the procedure, which is completely normal. In fact, it’s the same thing that occurs when someone cracks their knuckles.

After the procedure, you may feel some soreness or aching in the muscles or spinal joints. If it occurs, this kind of discomfort usually happens within the first few hours of treatment. It should not last longer than 24 hours (and if it does, be sure to contact Dr. Swistak for assistance). If you like, you can place an ice pack on the affected area which should help reduce the symptoms and help you recover more quickly.

Dr. Swistak caters his treatments to each patient’s tolerance and comfort level, and will gradually increase the aggressiveness of the treatment based on what is most effective for the individual. He will always take into account any previous chiropractic treatment experience the patient has had. If a prior approach was successful, he will incorporate it into the current treatment plan if possible.

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